American Sign Language (ASL)

Our American Sign Language program explores naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Please be advised that some colleges may not accept American Sign Language as a world language. Check with individual college admissions offices for specific information regarding world language requirements.

American Sign Language (ASL) I
Grade Level 9-12
5 Credits - Full Year

American Sign Language is a visual language with vocabulary, grammar, idioms, and syntax different from English. This course focuses on the development of conversational sign-language skills and the grammatical structure of American Sign Language. Students are exposed to a variety of sign systems and modes of communication used by the Deaf community. This course introduces the history of sign language and the importance of Deaf culture. Class participation is an integral part of the course.

American Sign Language (ASL) II
Grade Level 10-12
5 Credits - Full Year

This is the second course of our three-year ASL program. Students will add to their study of ASL vocabulary and increase proficiency in expressive and receptive conversational skills using more complex grammatical structures. Students will continue to learn about Deaf culture, and Deaf history. ASL has no vocal component; therefore, when students are utilizing the language there will be no voicing allowed. Class participation is an integral part of the course.

American Sign Language (ASL) III
Grade Level 11-12
5 Credits - Full Year

This is the culminating course of our three-year ASL program. Students will add to their study of ASL vocabulary and increase proficiency in expressive and receptive conversational skills using more complex grammatical structures. Students will continue to learn about Deaf culture, and Deaf history. ASL has no vocal component; therefore, when students are utilizing the language there will be no voicing allowed. Class participation is an integral part of the course.